Physical Literacy in the Library Or, how we ended up loaning out rubber chickens

  • Jenny Cofell Lethbridge Public Library
  • Barbara Longair Lethbridge Public Library
  • Lisa Weeks Lethbridge Public Library
Keywords: Alberta, public libraries, community building, physical activities

Abstract

We must consider the reality: most Canadian children are not receiving the required amount of daily physical activity for healthy development. Seven percent of five- to eleven-year-olds and four per cent of 12- to 17-year-olds in Canada meeting recommended guidelines of 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity daily. Canadian adults are not participating in the required amount of weekly physical activity to maintain health (150 minutes per week). Canadian children have insufficient skill levels to participate in everyday physical activity (biking, running, jumping, playground games and equipment). WE have a public health issue -- and the PUBLIC library can help.

Author Biographies

Jenny Cofell, Lethbridge Public Library
Jenny Cofell coordinates children’s programs and collections for the Lethbridge Public Library
system. An avid oral storyteller, she shares her love of songs, rhymes, and stories with friends,
family, and anyone who wanders into the library.
Barbara Longair, Lethbridge Public Library
Barbara Longair, after working in various academic and public libraries, landed her dream job
managing a busy and dynamic children’s department. She gets to share her dedication to Early
Literacy with her fantastic colleagues and the community and loves that part of her work day
involves tickling baby toes.
Lisa Weeks, Lethbridge Public Library
Lisa Weekes has worked in a variety of roles in academic and public libraries, as well as in research
for the provincial government. At Lethbridge Public Library, Lisa is responsible for adult
collections, programs, and services. Community partnerships and outreach are her personal and
professional passions.
Published
2016-01-27