Angling Oral History Project - Montana State University (MSU) Library

About the Angling Oral History Project

What is it?

Angling Oral History Project The Montana State University Library Special Collection's Angling Oral History Project seeks to interview anglers, politicians, artists, authors, and just about anyone else whose work relates to trout and salmon. This project is part of the Montana State University's effort to develop a Trout and Salmonid Collection. We are seeking to preserve the memory of angling in our time in order to capture what we have and what we have lost. To date we have interviewed over 50 participants. Our interviewees are selected based on their relationship to Trout and Salmon with an emphasis on selecting interviewees with a wide variety of expertise in order to paint as full and diverse picture as possible.

We have interviewed the angling artist A.D. Maddox at her home in Nashville, TN; former Secretary of the Interior for Fish, Wildlife and Parks Nathaniel Reed; author and guide shop owner Charlie Craven; and the Superintendent of Yellowstone National Park, Dan Wenk just to name a few. The project has recently received funding from the Willow Springs Foundation.

We ask all interviewees a series of questions like “what do you see as the greatest threat in the next few decades to trout and salmonids?” or “tell us what fishing means to you?” In addition we ask questions aimed the individual’s area of expertise. The interviews are conducted by our special collections librarian, James Thull, using a Canon VIXUA HF G20 digital video camera. While a few interviews have been done in our special collections reading room we typically conduct them outside of the library at the individuals home or place of business.

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], [Item permalink or DOI], Angling Oral History Project, Montana State University (MSU) Library, Bozeman, MT

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